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How to run your own court case

How to run your own court case

How to run your own court case:  a practical guide to representing yourself in Australian courts and tribunals (non-criminal cases) Cover

by Nadine Behan.
A Redfern Legal Publishing Book, 2009.

A practical guide to representing yourself in Australian courts and tribunals [non-criminal cases]

A step-by-step guide to running a non-criminal case in a court or tribunal, with advice on making and defending a claim, collecting evidence, negotiating a settlement, presenting a case and appealing the result. It includes case studies, checklists, and an explanation of legal terms. This guide applies to all types of civil litigation including family law, neighbour disputes, debt claims, tenancy disputes and appealing a government decision.

Note that the NSW Civil and Administrative Tribunal (NCAT) has replaced 23 tribunals in NSW, including the Consumer, Trader and Tenancy Tribunal.

Copies of this book are also available in the Find Legal Answers Tool Kit at your local public library.


 

Chapters

Chapter one

About this book

Introduction - about the author.

Chapter two

Why represent yourself

Reasons to represent yourself - cost - equality before the law

Chapter three

A word about lawyers

Solicitors - barristers - finding a solicitor - costs agreements - disbursements - case studies.

Chapter four

Should you get a lawyer?

How complex is your case - which legal body will be hearing the case - how much money is involved - what else is at stake - knowing your needs.

Chapter five

Do you have a case at all?

Importance of defining and isolating your grievance.

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Disclaimer: 

© Nadine Behan 2009. A Redfern Legal Centre Publishing book published by University of New South Wales Press Ltd.

While every effort has been made to make the information contained in this book as up to date and accurate as possibleto reflect the laws and the legal system of Australia as at August 2008, its contents are not intended as legal advice. Use it as a guide only and be sure to obtain legal advice for your specific legal problem.