How to run your own court case

How to run your own court case

How to run your own court case:  a practical guide to representing yourself in Australian courts and tribunals (non-criminal cases) Cover

by Nadine Behan.
A Redfern Legal Publishing Book, 2009.

A practical guide to representing yourself in Australian courts and tribunals [non-criminal cases]

A step-by-step guide to running a non-criminal case in a court or tribunal, with advice on making and defending a claim, collecting evidence, negotiating a settlement, presenting a case and appealing the result. It includes case studies, checklists, and an explanation of legal terms. This guide applies to all types of civil litigation including family law, neighbour disputes, debt claims, tenancy disputes and appealing a government decision.

Note that the NSW Civil and Administrative Tribunal (NCAT) has replaced 23 tribunals in NSW, including the Consumer, Trader and Tenancy Tribunal.

Copies of this book are also available in the Find Legal Answers Tool Kit at your local public library.


 

Chapters

Chapter six

Should your case end up in court?

Alternatives to legal proceedings - dispute resolution - community justice centres - industry ombudsmen - case study.

Chapter seven

Where to go for help

Getting legal information and advice - court processes - finding legislation and cases - legal research. 

Chapter eight

Our legal system

Types of law - how law is made - how the system works - types of legal approach - legal remedies.

Chapter nine

The litigation process

Claim - defence - conference - hearing - result.

Chapter ten

The golden rules of litigation

What to do and what not to do to succeed.

Disclaimer: 

© Nadine Behan 2009. A Redfern Legal Centre Publishing book published by University of New South Wales Press Ltd.

While every effort has been made to make the information contained in this book as up to date and accurate as possibleto reflect the laws and the legal system of Australia as at August 2008, its contents are not intended as legal advice. Use it as a guide only and be sure to obtain legal advice for your specific legal problem.