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How to run your own court case

How to run your own court case

How to run your own court case:  a practical guide to representing yourself in Australian courts and tribunals (non-criminal cases) Cover

by Nadine Behan.
A Redfern Legal Publishing Book, 2009.

A practical guide to representing yourself in Australian courts and tribunals [non-criminal cases]

A step-by-step guide to running a non-criminal case in a court or tribunal, with advice on making and defending a claim, collecting evidence, negotiating a settlement, presenting a case and appealing the result. It includes case studies, checklists, and an explanation of legal terms. This guide applies to all types of civil litigation including family law, neighbour disputes, debt claims, tenancy disputes and appealing a government decision.

 


 

Chapters

Chapter eleven

Preparing your case part 1

Preparing a claim - preparing a defence - checklists - case studies.

Chapter twelve

Preparing your case part 2

Photos, videos, digital images - witnesses - experts - government documents - non-government information - medical records - police reports - rules of evidence - legal research - legal documents - drafting legal documents - filing, serving and tendering.

Chapter thirteen

Preparing your case part 3

Stage 1 - the preliminary outline - how a hearing works - stage 2 - the main outline - witnesses - stage 3 - the summarised outline - final preparations for the hearing.

Chapter fourteen

The hearing

What to expect - courtroom and tribunal room layout - how to address magistrate or tribunal member.

Chapter fifteen

The result

Winning and losing - enforcement - appeals.

Disclaimer: 

© Nadine Behan 2009. A Redfern Legal Centre Publishing book published by University of New South Wales Press Ltd.

While every effort has been made to make the information contained in this book as up to date and accurate as possibleto reflect the laws and the legal system of Australia as at August 2008, its contents are not intended as legal advice. Use it as a guide only and be sure to obtain legal advice for your specific legal problem.